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In a prior blog, I wrote about the JTAG specification’s upcoming 30th anniversary, and reflected on how it has evolved over the years, and the powerful use cases it can be put to. This week, we look at how to secure the JTAG interface, to prevent its abuse by bad actors.
JTAG is coming up on its 30th anniversary. And some would say it’s older than that. As I prepared for doing an introductory presentation on this amazing technology, I got a chance to reflect on how useful it has become, and what the next 30 years might be like.
Do you know how it feels when you have an itch, and you just have to scratch it? Well, after an extended hiatus from writing, I felt an overwhelming compulsion to do another MinnowBoard image build with source and symbols, do some more exploring, and then blog about it.
ASSET recently released an enhanced product for testing i.MX6-based board designs using JTAG. I fired up this new tool on the Boundary Devices SABRE Lite board, with some fun and interesting results.
In the last blog, I explored the JTAG scan path of the ScanLite demonstration board. In this article, I do a deeper dive into what options are available within ScanWorks to verify the scan path, and explore some of the underlying technology of IEEE 1149.1.
In Episode 41, Hacking the Linux Kernel, Part 2, I successfully hacked the Linux kernel, both on a native Linux partition, and within a Ubuntu VM on VirtualBox, by using the general directions within the Linux Newbies First Kernel Patch tutorial. This week, I worked towards hacking the Linux kernel using a Yocto-based qemux86 on VirtualBox, as a final step towards actually hacking the kernel on my MinnowBoard.
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