Category: Boundary Scan

Since its inception, ScanWorks has provided board-level shorts and opens testing of interconnects between Boundary-Scan devices through use of its Automatic Test Pattern Generation (ATPG) feature. ScanWorks ATPG creates the patterns necessary for shorts and opens testing based on the board topology (i.e. connections between devices) and the Boundary-Scan Cell types on the I/O pins within each device. With recent enhancements, ScanWorks can now generate patterns that can be applied by chip-level automatic test equipment (ATE) to test for shorts and opens in the interconnections between silicon “chiplets” in multi-die devices.
Today, February 15th, 2020, marks the official 30th Anniversary of JTAG. What a wild ride it has been – from its humble beginnings for detecting short and open circuits, it has evolved to be, in some ways, the most powerful and feared technology on the planet. How did we get here?
JTAG is coming up on its 30th anniversary. And some would say it’s older than that. As I prepared for doing an introductory presentation on this amazing technology, I got a chance to reflect on how useful it has become, and what the next 30 years might be like.
ASSET recently released an enhanced product for testing i.MX6-based board designs using JTAG. I fired up this new tool on the Boundary Devices SABRE Lite board, with some fun and interesting results.
In the last blog, I explored the JTAG scan path of the ScanLite demonstration board. In this article, I do a deeper dive into what options are available within ScanWorks to verify the scan path, and explore some of the underlying technology of IEEE 1149.1.
I’ve gotten all of my Christmas shopping done early, so I managed to make some time for exploring our ScanWorks test tool. I’m taking a “newbie approach” to using the tool, initially for hacking around with boundary-scan test. There’s some pretty cool technology here.
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