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If you want to learn about UEFI, you have to be able to see the source code and debug it. Here’s how to build a debug Tianocore image on the AAEON UP Xtreme Whiskey Lake board, flash it onto the target, and use SourcePoint to debug it with Intel Direct Connect Interface (DCI).
Recently as ASSET is a 3rd party tool supporter of Xilinx FPGAs for a number of applications, I was reviewing the Xilinx community seeing a lot of users trying to use Vivado and Platform Cable USB II pod for production in-system programming with less-than-optimal results or no results at all. First, Xilinx says the Platform Cable USB II with Vivado/SDK as the UI, is to be used for prototype programming and is a design tool, not a production tool.
Finally! A publicly available board with Intel Direct Connect Interface (DCI) working out of the box. With our SourcePoint JTAG-based debugger, it is now possible to explore the inner workings of low-level firmware with all the power of CPU-hardware-assisted run-control and trace features, including Intel Processor Trace and Architectural Event Trace.
In collaboration with the UEFI Forum, I’ll be presenting Beyond Printf: Real-Time UEFI Debugging on Wednesday, October 27th, 2021 at 10am CT. Register here: https://www.brighttalk.com/webcast/18206/512103 to watch the session live, and/or later view the recorded video. What powerful new debugging and trace features exist on the latest Intel silicon? Continue reading, or watch the webinar.
For debugging firmware, print statements (“printf”) are often our most powerful tool: some bugs are caused by complex sequences of events that are too long and intricate to root-cause using just breakpoints and watch windows. In this article, I write about my explorations into “at-speed printf”.
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