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Do you know how it feels when you have an itch, and you just have to scratch it? Well, after an extended hiatus from writing, I felt an overwhelming compulsion to do another MinnowBoard image build with source and symbols, do some more exploring, and then blog about it.
ASSET recently released an enhanced product for testing i.MX6-based board designs using JTAG. I fired up this new tool on the Boundary Devices SABRE Lite board, with some fun and interesting results.
In the last blog, I explored the JTAG scan path of the ScanLite demonstration board. In this article, I do a deeper dive into what options are available within ScanWorks to verify the scan path, and explore some of the underlying technology of IEEE 1149.1.
In Episode 41, Hacking the Linux Kernel, Part 2, I successfully hacked the Linux kernel, both on a native Linux partition, and within a Ubuntu VM on VirtualBox, by using the general directions within the Linux Newbies First Kernel Patch tutorial. This week, I worked towards hacking the Linux kernel using a Yocto-based qemux86 on VirtualBox, as a final step towards actually hacking the kernel on my MinnowBoard.
Rejoice, Linux kernel newbies. Last week, I hacked an Ethernet driver in the Linux kernel, but the hack didn’t work; it turns out that the driver I chose isn’t used in my native Linux image on my PC. This week, I tackled the problem again, with success! And if I can do it, you can, too.
I’ve gotten all of my Christmas shopping done early, so I managed to make some time for exploring our ScanWorks test tool. I’m taking a “newbie approach” to using the tool, initially for hacking around with boundary-scan test. There’s some pretty cool technology here.
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